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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 4:00pm EDT
cognitive science, and he is cofounder of the new england institute for cognitive science, an evolutionary study. religious studies at the university of very good. he's been an unflagging student of how human beings make their way in the world, even though that way is often not pretty. he challenges each reader to tinker with their own wiring, to be aware, and he hopes to do better. for his profound insights into the human condition and into the conditions, some humans play some others, we present him the anisfield-wolf book award for nonfiction. [applause] ♪ the night this is wonderful and i deeply appreciate the fact that such a distinguished jury read my book, much less thought it worthy of this great honor. in a moment i am going to read you an excerpt from "less than human," which deals the course of the atrocities of the past. but i think it is useful to remind ourselves that the plaintiff considering atrocities that the path is to make a better future. if we can understand what has driven us to do the terrible thing we've done to our fellow human beings, perhaps we can fashion the
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:00am EDT
antonio mendez hosing as a hollywood producer scouting out locations or a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." this is about 30 minutes. >> if we could have everybody in the back come on up that's going to join us. thank you so much for your patience. the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block was around as. apparently -- thank you. people are nodding, so that's good. thank you very much. there may be some people still held up and we will welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter earnest, executive director and i'll ask you as a courtesy, to those for recording the program and to the speakers, the kind enough to turn off your cell phones, pdas and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. well, it's wonderful to see all of you here for the signing, and as we kick off the signing, i will show you a clip of the film based on the book for which you came to attempt the signing. so with that said we will go right ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. >> [inaudible] >> has shocked the civilized world. more than 60 american
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 7:00am EDT
the innovation has come from, it has not come from r&d, science-based a physical science-based breakthrough. most of it has come from commercialization of the internet which is not as scientific and research based as we typically think of as occurring in universities house of representatives my undergraduate degree is in electrical engineering and look what i'm doing. i take your point. i vaguely remember the three laws of dynamics. so yeah, i take your point but my point is less would've the undergraduate, i don't know we can argue but how important that is, but more, i take your point about the commercialization and the browsers and all that was definitely private, occasional borrowing for more basic research, but my point was that seems like a really critical element was sort of just was the critical mass of people out there, and the guys who founded google were guys who were getting their ph.d's at stanford, you know, and they developed an algorithm out of their training. and just the fact that she did have people working on systems engineering, and it's less the undergradu
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 5:00pm EDT
for a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." it's about thirty minutes. if we can have nerve the back come on. thank you for your patience. we have -- the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block here was horrendous. apparently thank you, people are nodding. that's good. thank you very much. so there may be some people held up still. we'll welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter, the executive directer. ly ask you as a court sei those who are recording the program and the speakers to be kind enough to turn off your cell phone, pda and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. that said we'll go ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. the people die. we want the six of them out. what we want is -- deliver the six by providing them with -- you can send them training wheels and get them to the board we are gatorade. it would take a miracle to get them out. what are we watching? i have an idea. there are canadian film crew for science fiction. we file together as a company. this is how we make a big movie. you want to come
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:45am EDT
her own right. there was an article about what the science article written about 30 or 35 years ago about the women in congress and the title was over his dead body. and there's still quite a few women in congress who got their because their husbands die. some of the first women, she followed her husband who had died when the policy and then took that over. and so, kassebaum was the first one who would never followed the south. and now once again gave her a lot of tension. it is a very highly visible rays, covered even one of the london newspapers commented it the day after the election. q. we have one woman in the senate. if you're one woman you would get a lot of attention. two years after she was elected she was like one of the temperatures of the national convention. people were already touting her as a national force a national figure. and she had a lot going for her that i think they commanders should be undertaken if that's not presidential, at least vice presidential. that way she blended with what was said was talking about. those of you remember nancy kassebaum, she was a
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 11:00am EDT
called build a data science team. increasingly that sort of function is becoming a core function of the campaign. used to be to the extension of data it was left for fund-raising or you could buy vendors our consultants. and now, you know, people will have call them different things but there's basically the core function of a modern campaign to people, especially on the photo site, just crushing and processing data. >> if any of us were to go to the romney campaign or the obama campaign and where to look around the headquarters, how many people, is there a lot of young staff? what does it look like? >> guest: chicago, dozens of people depending i had how you define it, analytics him and then in every state they are hiring for jobs that are dated jobs, voter file managers, targeting directors, that's, you, the obama campaign will have thousands around the country and i guess hundreds of them are directly interacting with the data everyday. >> host: do you think one of the parties, republicans or the democrats, is more adept at using this technique? or are they all sort of at the same le
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 12:00pm EDT
johnson, the best-selling science writer will talk about the cyberworld, popular culture and computer networking as a political tool. mr. johnson is the author of eight nonfiction books including every name, were good ideas come from an the 2012 release, future perfect. >> host: steven johnson come in your newest book, in a network age, use those term pre-progressive. what is that? >> guest: it is my attempt to come up with a term for this new political philosophy that i see emerging all around me. the book is really people who are trying to change the world in trying to ban progress, but he don't completely fit the existing models that we have between the left in the right or democrats and republicans. they believe in many ways that the way the internet was built, the way the web was built, the way things that wikipedia were built, using these collaborative. the works, where people come together from different points of view and openly collaborating, building ideas, that that mechanism is a tremendous engine for progress and growth. but it doesn't necessarily involve a gover
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 12:00am EDT
ideas on science, had this interesting pattern where they, actually had a lot more kind of failed papers. and they published, they had far more volume to their work, and a huge number of those papers never went anywhere. it was every now and then, there would be one that would be incredible breakout hit and would change science forever, then most of the time they were starting out hitting like baseball a short little ground out whereas the none in -- noninnovative thinkers, who hadn't had disruptive idea, they were just hitting kind of singles and were much more consistent, had higher batting average but weren't swinging for the fences. so the argument is that to really be kind of successful in a new way and open up a new door or possibility in your field or science or some other field you have to have tolerance for failure and error. that is one of the things we see in silicon valley. is that that is if you're an entrepreneur in silicon valley and you haven't had at least one failed startup people look at you strangely. you're supposed to try and miss that means you're taking ris
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)